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Archive for May, 2013

May
28
posted by tommy

I found myself leaning into my desktop as I listened to Andromeda, the first track from Laurence’s debut record William, Andromeda (though not the first song by that name we’ve shared together). I found myself leaning inward because the vocals have been levelled quite low and they’re delivered in an entirely vulnerable, quivering hush. It’s quite captivating even if it’s forced me to have my volume screamingly high and the bleeps and blips pulsing out of my office are likely doing our office junior’s head in, but that’s my divinely attributed right as a top-dog big-budget cash-money mega-hyphenated business-type. My high roller status appears heavily at odds with a record this grounded in humility though, so for the purposes of aural relationship I’m going to drop the pretense and recognise this for the rich and resonant expression that it is. Thematically it’s about the struggles involved in maintaining a relationship with someone suffering from mental illness and that content is lyrically present and underscored by a subtlety of sound and a serious attention to detail across the various soundscapes on the record. The layering and the mixed down vocals remind me a lot of Youth Lagoon’s Year of Hibernation. I’ve chosen two tracks to get you started but I really, really think you should listen to the whole record rather than these singular cuts.

May
23
posted by tommy

Remember Silent Jay? You damn well should, I only posted it about a day ago you fat idiot. That was unfair, sorry. It’s been a long day + you’ve lost weight. Silent Jay was the cat I posted about at the end of April. Featured on one of his tracks was a man who goes by the name of Kirkis. Very little else is known about him, even within his closest circle of friends and extended family. He’s the enigma, shrouded in a cloak of secrets, walking on a bassline of mystery. I’ve done some sleuthing though and I’ll share with you what little I know. Kirkis was born in the small city of Mytishchi, deep in the heart of Soviet Russia. After subsisting primarily on used breadcrusts and found vermin, Kirkis fancied he could eke out a living in the big city so he ventured forth with his family to Moscow where, after opening a caricature stand, the family’s prospects began to look up. Sadly, democracy and liberalism weren’t features of the 70s socialist soviet and so the family’s short lived success came crashing down as a young Kirkis delved into the prohibited world of illicit groove. Found guilty of dealing in the binary rythms of the gypsy communes, Kirkis was sentenced to twelve years hard labour in Siberia but somewhere along the way the young jazzhound managed to elude his captors and jump a ship to Australia. Now residing in Melbourne, Kirkis writes songs that speak of love and loss, of a family left behind and a nation that groaned under the weight of an oppressive regime. His wandering basslines speak deeply of geographical displacement and the ludicrously pleasurable rhodes lines within his freeform arrangements point toward bigger truths and profound wonders.

If you’re lucky enough to be attending the Thundercat show at Oxford Art Factory in a few weeks side you’ll see the man perform prior to Hiayayus Coyote and Thundercat. Should be a treat for synth starved ears.

May
20
posted by tommy

I’m going to place these before you largely without comment. Actually you know I’m not going to be able to help myself, without a LOT of comment. Two new tracks from Oscar that are mouthwateringly good and are pretty indicative of the direction he’s heading. I think his strength lies in his constant evolution and we’re seeing the mid-to-end stage of his most recent metamorphosis. I’m rather glad to be able to share with you a talent as prodigious as this man so it’s hard for me to avoid gushing out something overly weighty and pregnant with praise. I’ll simply say that there’s a bright future for any individual who can drop tracks like these on a whim. The first is a slow building beast that speaks volumes about Oscar’s attention to production while the second is a cover of Miguel’s Sure Thing that doesn’t deviate too far from the original. The key lesson learned here though, is that the guy has a set of pipes on him. We always knew he could knock up a legitimate beat but this is a hell of a vocal showing. For those interested to see how this translates live then your time is nigh, come see him headline at FBI Social on Thursday, 30th May.

May
16
posted by tommy

The new single from Tim fitz is reportedly definitely the herald of an album impending. Just quietly, but actually not that quietly as this is an unprotected public website, I’ve had the opportunity to listen to said album and it’s rife with experimental oddities and bizarro synth moments and all in all it’s just really endearing. There are some truly creative production choices, especially on the slower more ambient tracks which give more breathing space to both bassline and piano struts which are likely Fitz’s biggest strengths. For the moment though, you’ve just got this first taste with which to content yourself. It’s weird, it’s whacky, it’s euphoric and it’s more infectious than Ebola which is considered by many to be pretty infectious I reckon. Stream at it.

Tim Fitz will be performing in support of Oscar Key Sung & JONES Jnr. as part of the debut Sound Doctrine showcase (co-presented with Circular Key) at FBi Social on May 30. Not to be missed.

May
13
posted by tommy

This jam raises a whole bunch of questions for me but similarly it provides the answers for those willing to take them at face value. I’m even willing to GIVE them at face value. Anyway, I think it’s reasonably well accepted now that the folk bubble has burst and we’re living in a post-folk world that has retained the cream from the top and a few dreggs from the bottom. Obviously, we still have Mumford and Sons (upto you which camp they fall into) but artists like Bon Iver and Fleet Foxes will both release records that sell and sell (or stream and stream, given consumption trends). The Tallest Man On Earth will still sell out Opera House shows, yes, but each and every time I see PR batting in a folk act I can only really think ‘whoops’. It’s all pretty and lovely and heartfelt but if you’ll cast your mind back five years folk was actually the realm of the tastemakers which doesn’t really seem to be the case anymore.

So, that established [at least in mine own eyes] then comes the question on everyone’s lips; where to now for Angus and Julia fans? Do they go down with the ship? I say no. No they don’t. And the best possible island to which I can see these folks swimming is one called Willow Beats. Let’s pause to recognise the logical inconsistency of that last metaphor. Willow Beats are Melbourne producer and vocalist Narayana Johnson and Kalyani Ellis. I’m sure more than a few of you are familiar with Willow Beats and are preparing a supersized takedown for my comments section but who there big guy. Ease your heart, hear me out. This isn’t a criticism. Angus and Julia weren’t always reserved for screaming 16 year old girls, I presume they were once the domain of reputable music types. Maybe they were, anyway, I’m swinging blindly here. This is a guy girl duo sporting forest friendly press shots and highly accessible female vocal lines over a semi drum’n'bass beat. Granted, the beat throws you in an entirely different direction to ol’ A+J and there isn’t the reliance on vom-worthy hyper-emotion but I can see this happening in a big way accross the Js. Even artists likes Mammals are blurring the lines between folk and electronica though not in the same way the folktronica acts of 2005-2010 did, but in a manner more beats-centric. Mammals ft. Flash forest even sat at #3 on Hype Machine for a period though in the global domain it’s probably far less edgy.

All of that is semi-vaguely pointing you and I at Cambio Sun whose reasonably recent track Intuition (a total winner, I might add) has been a mainstay of my listening experience since Hugh posted about it a day or two back. Nope, not one for the Angus and Julia fans but for those who once folked, this isn’t a stretch. For those who loved their Sufjans and their Bon Ivers (and were ok with the both of them being slightly exploratory in their more recent sounds) this could have some serious appeal. So again, I direct you to this as a primary example of a transitional artist that heralds in a new sphere within which we can praise the lords of harmony and falsetto. It’s got slow build and some really very pretty tones and again, producer and saccarine vocal have their merry way with each other.

Also we need to collectively agree to do everything within our powers to prevent techno from being an in thing again. It’s on its way.

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