Uncategorized

Nov
23
posted by tommy

After crafting one of the records of the damn year, the newly minted trio of Yon Yonson went and produced the beat for Simo Soo’s ‘Stoned In The Supermarket’ which features three separate MCs across it’s length, likely an attempt to maintain the every important producer / vocalist binary. Way to keep it future fellas. The beat is bouncier than a bag of popcorn incorrectly placed upsidedown in a microwave which also happens to be on the moon where there isn’t that much gravity. There are a few presumably lifted horn samples chopped into the chorus while sparkling synth sounds lift off a rolling bassline. The lyrical sections are seemingly nonsensical but only until you realise that the song is fundamentally based around the concept of – CORRECT – being Stoned In The Supermarket. Something about Taylor Henderson or Taylor Hanson and a Katy Perry necklace or something. The Marky Vaw verse is a little more abstract but by the time the Boobjob section comes back around we’re rolling into a stream of consciousness that makes about as much sense as it should considering the trajectory of the track. The song is lifted from Simo Soo’s fourth-ish EP Sootopia which is the most cohesive release I’ve heard from the the prolific son of a gun to date. There’s a couple of LP’s and remix records for you to get into too, for those that are really feeling this.

Nov
20
posted by tommy

This one caught me by surprise a little in that it was unexpectedly gooooorgeous and sounds as close to Odesza as you’re likely to find in our neck of the woods. It’s not altogether reflective of the EP of which it’s a part, being slightly slower and keeping slightly less kick than the three other tracks but for my money it’s the stand-out single. There’s an instrumental hip-hop vibe to the five tracker but not in the same sample-everything-take-no-prisoners way we’ve seen (re)surging this past decade. The sounds are crisp, the percussive tones are warm and the whole thing stirs me just right. Undoubtedly one of the hottest producers based in Nambour right now.

Nov
19
posted by tommy

Spirit Faces is Pete and Anatole is Jonathan and when Pete met Jonathan it was even better than When Harry Met Sally which is a movie specifically created to demonstrate how good it can be when two people meet. Pete Covington is the producer~vocalist~instrumentalist known as Spirit Faces and Jonathan Baker is producer~multi-multi-multi-instrumentalist known as Anatole and they’re a rather perfect match in that a) the resulting song was fantastic, b) they both play about 112 different instruments and c) both of them are on the rise. Anatole has a couple of big name remixes on the way while Spirit Faces has a much hyped EP now recorded and some hot-pocket support slots soon to be announced. The track is out through my very own record label called TEEF so if you came here hoping for any degree of impartiality you’re dreeeeeaaaaaming. The track embodies much of why I wanted to start this label- young, talented musicians collaborating and creating art that may not have existed without the label. Even if I never make a dime from the thing, if I can have two or three of these each year and an EP to boot I’ll be a happy little labelfellow.

If you want to follow the label for news of future exploits you can do so on:
SOUNDCLOUDFACEBOOKBANDCAMPTWITTER

 

Nov
18
posted by tommy

As far as I’m concerned, the weirder that Collarbones go, the better. Their 2011 record Iconography was laden with out there beats and chopped and sampled vocals and didn’t sound a whole lot like anything else at that time and evening seemingly at this time. They’ve since dropped a lot of the instrumental sections from their recordings and it’s become largely about Marcus’ voice (which can be a great thing) but producer R&B outfits aren’t a rarity at the moment and I want to hear Collarbones being the rarity they were. To keep on with that phrase, I reckon this new Collarbones track is rarer than some of their more recent recordings have been and I think all the better for it. It’d be easy for me to focus on that Oscar section but Marcus’ first half and conclusion both ride the beat gloriously, almost closer to his work with Black Vanilla than other Collarbones songs.

Nov
17
posted by tommy

These past six months of work at the label at which I work at for work have been a rollercoaster ride of promotion and relegation. For a few weeks I was the Deputy-Head of Lunch Breaks before being demoted to Acting Junior Music Sciences Liaison. A few weeks ago though, I took on the mantle of Remix Authoritarian and quickly stamped my mark with two of the damndest remixes you’ll ever darn well hear this week.

We’ll start domestic with youngblood Dylan Tainsh aka The Sugarsynth aka Scarpeggio aka (but also exclusively known as) Dugong Jr. He’s a Melbourne dude who’s been at it a few minutes and is getting some traction now with a single called In Love but I honestly feel like this remix might be one of the best things he’s put online right yet. He’s taken a sit-down with Thelma Plum’s ‘How Much Does Your Love Cost?’ and the resulting jam has been awarded an honourary five star rating from the NSW Hotel and Tourism board for outstanding comfort and excellent service. The original M-PHAZES produced track had some some venom to it and Tainsh has leeched some of the poison to leave it brighter and warmer while still retaining plenty of the residual heat. Dude has something going on here because this song is really, really good and I’ve listened to it a whole damn lot. I tried to imagine where a track like this would sit in the Australian music landscape if it weren’t considered a remix and I really think, if considered on its own merits, it stands out as something remarkably different.

A hard act to follow, sure, but not impossible if you’re a stone cold sample manipulating JAPANCITY colossus with Boiler Room cred and Red Bull Music Academy stripes on your lapel. Yosi Horikawa relaxedly walks into the wilderness, records what he hears, pitch shifts, manipulates the resulting sounds into beats and after planting a flag or two, usually annexes smaller nations as part of the process. The resulting songs are astounding sharp, precise down to the final minutiae and laden with organic samples. ‘Young In Love’ was already my favourite track from Thelma Plum’s Monsters EP but doubly so now that this new Horikawa edit is here for the listening. I’m not bold enough to say it’s improved upon the original but if it hasn’t, it’s certainly come close ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Shoutouts to both these dudes for improving both my job and my iPod.

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